Alumni Post: What Adulting is Actually Like

Being a recent graduate of the Honors College, I knew that if I had survived my Honors sequence, I could survive anything–not really, but those are tough! What I wasn’t ready for was the transition from college to being an adult. Everybody always says “adulting is hard,” but I always thought that the statement in large part was sarcastic. What I wasn’t ready for was how very true  it  was. Although the transition from being in college to working a full-time job and other adult responsibilities has its challenges, I’ve learned in my six months of being a college graduate that it’s important to keep the same good habits that we learn in college.

In July I went through a lot of life changes: I began working at Whirlpool Corporation in their Internal Audit area, moved to a new city, moved into an apartment for my first time (I was a Resident Assistant in freshmen dorms for three years at Grand Valley), and have been attempting to do other adult-like things. In addition to all of these changes, starting in Internal Audit was an unfamiliar department for me as I had never studied it while in the Business College.

Yet even when I felt like I was in over my head, my college habits seemed to always come in handy. My Honors Sequence always challenged me to ask questions and further my curiosity, so why couldn’t it apply here too? I found myself diving into areas that I had never seen before, and asking the really tough questions, because that was what Honors had prepared me to do.

While I may not feel as though my skills are fit for the Internal Audit function for forever, Whirlpool is a large enough corporation that will allow me to grow and adapt within it. One thing that my time at GVSU taught me is that you have to take advantage of opportunities that come your way. If I hadn’t said yes to joining the internal audit function itself, I would not have had the opportunity to travel to Tulsa, Oklahoma or Atlanta, Georgia. Without saying yes to my co-worker inviting me to attend a Young Professionals Meeting, I wouldn’t have made many of my friends or had the opportunity to plan an event for our Young Professionals Network.

The habit of saying yes is something that took me very far during my four years at Grand Valley, and has continued to take me a long way in my three months of working in “the real world.” The transferable skill I learned in the Honors College is that it’s okay to be challenged and not always know exactly what you are doing. While we may stress out in the moment about what the outcome of the challenge will be (mainly whether or not we’ll get an A), we become talented in the mentality of faking it until you make it. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, watch this Ted Talk.

While it is frustrating at times, it’s important to accept the challenge and learn as much as you can from it. If you make it a habit, it is a skill that will benefit you for the rest of your career, trust me.

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Ella Fritzemeier graduated in April 2017 with a degree in Business Administration (majored in Economics and Finance) and a minor in Spanish. She was able to travel for two weeks around Europe before starting at Whirlpool Corporation in their Finance Development Program, starting in the Internal Audit Department. Ella enjoys reading and exploring new places.

 

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Alumni Post: What does Honors have to offer?

As a recent (and extremely proud) GVSU Honors College graduate, I vividly recall some of the fears and anxieties that crept through my head as I neared graduation. During my last semester in Allendale, I knew that I would be enrolling in a master’s program in higher education administration/student affairs upon graduation, but I did not know where that would take me or what sort of work that would involve. Now, having successfully conquered year one of my graduate studies, I would like to offer some practical advice to those Honors students or alumni who may be considering an advanced degree (or two) to further their careers and personal ambitions.

Although my master’s program is easily built upon everything that I was engaged with as a Laker, I cannot emphasize enough that the wide range of high-quality opportunities that GVSU offers is remarkable. To prepare for graduate school and separate one’s self from the pack, the resources around campus can really set a student up phenomenally well for future success. Whether that’s studying a language abroad, completing an internship with any of the major companies in the Grand Rapids area, volunteering in poverty-stricken areas over spring break across the country, or combining all three of those outlets, GVSU is poised to give you experiences that can be tailored to shape your graduate school career before you even consider applying. In a particular way, Honors is stacked with resources and connections waiting to propel you confidently forward into the graduate school arena. In just over a year since leaving Allendale, I have had the opportunity to listen to other highly-involved students from across the country and have worked at a range of higher education institutions, and I can safely endorse GVSU as an unusually exceptional university in fostering so many superb life and career-altering possibilities.

Until I was interviewed by dozens of potential employers at multiple universities across the Midwest last spring, I don’t think that I realized the enormous importance of the graduate student’s relationship with their supervisor and academic unit. Searching for and cultivating a high caliber of connection with these two groups can indelibly influence one’s graduate school trajectory, as well as a student’s drive for producing excellent work. Gratefully, I can say that I have found an enriching work environment in my graduate assistantship. However, I would not have been able to identify the potential lying beneath the surface of that solitary interview last year without having thrived under the phenomenal support of the GVSU Honors College. I want to implore Honors students who are considering graduate school to search for professional programs with professors, administrators, and supervisors like those that characterize the hallways and offices of Niemeyer. You may not find another academic environment that has so many finely tuned components (there is only one Holy Grail, after all), but the importance of searching for such a setting may be an undervalued aspect of selecting a graduate school.

To say that I am extremely thankful for the Honors College, both personally and professionally, is a massive understatement. My four years were engaging and formative, and have strongly influenced what I aspire to in my graduate degree (an internship with my current institution’s Honors College is on tap for the fall!) and future career, and I hope that they are similarly foundational for other Honors students considering graduate school.

Finally, I would like to take a moment to publicly thank Dr. J for his incredible leadership at GVSU for the past 10 years. He and many of his administrative staff members (particularly Amanda Cuevas and Janaan Decker) have demonstrated what it means to build an exemplar student-centered academic culture, which has tremendously influenced my career path. I can only pray to make the same sort of personal impact on students that he and the Honors College had on me.

Brad Mueller

Brad Mueller (’16) is halfway through his master’s degree in Higher Education Administration and Student Personnel at Kent State University in Ohio. His graduate assistantship is ​with the Office of International Programs and Education Abroad in the College of Arts and Sciences, where he has the opportunity to engage with a wide range of internationalization and education abroad efforts. Brad has been fortunate to build on his experiences and studies at GVSU through his various internships at a number of Midwestern universities. In his spare time, Brad enjoys running, reading, and exploring northeast Ohio.